Developing the Right Content Strategy for eCommerce Websites


16 Comments
  1. Dan, thanks for the in-depth info and links to additional tools that make it easier to understand and implement these strategies. I think the comparison grid is really useful when a buyer is trying to decide between a couple of models — and is nearly ready to buy.

    I’ll be sharing this with my own followers. Good stuff!

    • Glad it helped, Deb 🙂 I couldn’t agree more about the comparison grids. Really helps as an online buyer. It’s not fun getting the wrong item in the mail and having to deal with the return process.

  2. Amazing content! Thank you so much for writing it all down for us to share. Thanks again!

  3. Awesome article, there’s obviously a lot there for brands to think about & it takes real manpower (or an agency) to do at scale.

    I’m seeing lots of traction for E-com with syndicated sweepstakes, using your own products across partners that promote your sweepstakes for you – giving you access to a whole new audience (and links).

    • We’re seeing the same thing, Stuart. Especially when sweepstakes “catch on” in your particular niche. Usually, sites and blogs (especially those who promote sweepstakes) watch each other and will promote what others are promoting. That can result in a multitude of links, traffic and emails acquired.

  4. Great article, just found this during the process of building multiple e-commerce stores for personal use & clients. Lots of valuable content that will help set me in the right direction!

  5. A very good collection of ideas and how to. One question to Dan: Which of these content elements should better be put on a blog on an external domain and which ones on the shop domain (SEO and credibility point of view).
    Br René

    • Most of these strategies are best to put on the actual eCommerce store’s site, to attract quality traffic, engagement and more links/social shares by offering value to the target audience. However, I could see partnering with other quality, topically-related partners on things such as contests/sweepstakes, freemiums, etc.

  6. Killer article – thanks for going into such detail and for outlining so many factors to consider. And great job giving freemiums such a spotlight – just about all of our clients experience notable growth in search and/or referral traffic when they offer such content.

    • You got it, Corey. The Freemium strategy really works. Takes effort, but so does anything else that is quality.

  7. This a great guide, thanks for putting it together. We are in the early stages of revamping our website and content strategy, and this is incredibly helpful.

    Would you recommend creating pages for retail outlets for companies that do not actually own the stores? Meaning if you sell a product to a traditional retail store as a distributor, but it is not your own company owned store or a franchise?

    • Hi Tommy, I’m glad this guide is helping you. If you think creating those pages for retail outlets will provide value to your customers (or their customers), and there’s no negative repercussions of doing so, then why not? You could essentially have an “enhanced Dealers page,” where you provide insight as to what makes each store great, what products of yours they carry, etc. It might be tough to maintain, but I’d make a list of all the questions that you think the potential customer is going to have about the store (in relation to your product) and answer them via the content. Just weigh the efforts/impact of creating these pages against other page types that you’d need to create. You want to prioritize accordingly.

  8. Simple but effective tips, which of cosrue can also be used outside the realms of Facebook.Also by seeing the ads/images alongside your recommendations, it really brings your point home.Thank’s from Portugal.

  9. Great guidance, thanks. In terms of category page placement, which is common, seems like there are many approaches to placing that content. I wonder what the advantages are? In your Dick’s example, the content contained in the scroll bar. My assumption has always been that if it require “user action” then search bots discount that content, unlike the Asphalt example, where it’s on the bottom of the page in editorial style.

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About The Author

dan kern

Dan Kern (Alumni)

Dan Kern has more than 10 years experience in technical SEO, content strategy, on-page optimization and link building, utilizing white hat best practices to drive targeted customers and meet business goals.

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